Summer 2016:

16th Aprilfeast

More details

Medieval Festivities and Entertainments in East Anglia, Dr Kate Jewell (Independent Scholar)
Medieval people worked hard but also knew how to celebrate. This Study Day explores the ways in which Medieval East Anglians marked important festive occasions, and the activities they enjoyed at times of relaxation and entertainment.
23rd April
St GeorgeMore details
St George, Beowulf, and the Dragon, Dr Sam Newton (Independent Scholar)
A St George’s Day special on tales of heroes and dragons. Beginning with “the first dragon of English art,” from the Sutton Hoo shield, we shall consider “the first dragon of English literature,” in Beowulf, before looking at the fine Middle English poem of St George and the Dragon from the South English Legendary (c. 1400).
7th MayCrecy

More Details

Chivalry in Medieval England: From Sutton Hoo to Agincourt , Professor Nigel Saul (University of London)
Chivalry evokes a picture of knights performing brave deeds for their ladies. But what was it really like? This Study Day looks at chivalry’s origins, its code of military conduct, and its relationship to the Christian faith. It will also touch on chivalry’s impact on the world of romantic attachment.
14th MayrunesMore details An Introduction to Runes and Rune Lore, Dr Elizabeth Solopova (Oxford University)
A comprehensive introduction to the runic alphabet, runic inscriptions, and their linguistic and cultural contexts.
21st MayKing JohnMore details Restoring English Liberties! Anglo-Saxons, Magna Carta and the English Civil War Dr Andrew Lacey, (Ind. Scholar)
We will explore the idea of the ‘ancient constitution,’ the significance of Magna Carta, and the ways in which the Anglo-Saxons were re-imagined by seventeenth-century activists determined to restore English liberties.
11th Junerendlesham

More Details

The Rendlesham Project Professor Chris Scull FSA, & Jude Plouviez (SCC Archaeological Service)
Between 2008 and 2014 archaeological survey at Rendlesham in south-east Suffolk revealed an extensive settlement complex with evidence for activity from late prehistory to the present day. During the 5th to 8th centuries AD
the archaeology shows that this was a rich and important establishment, and was almost certainly the vicus regius or royal settlement mentioned by Bede in his Ecclesiastical History of the English People. The Study Day will review the reasons for the fieldwork project and the techniques used, and present the results of current research, interpreting the site and defining its local and wider contexts.
18th June

More details

Formidable Women of Anglo-Saxon England, Dr Sam Newton (Independent Scholar)
We shall reappraise female power in Britain, Europe, and Scandinavia from the sixth to the eleventh centuries – we shall see how pre-Christian female power was realised in early Christian England by the impressive numbers of saintly abbesses. We shall also look at examples of powerful women in later Anglo-Saxon England, such as Queen Ælfthryth, who appears to have provided the model for Shakespeare’s Lady Macbeth, and the formidable Emma of Normandy, queen, king-mother, and a central figure leading up to the great events of 1066.
25th JuneCross

More details

Woodlands, Trees, and Timber in Anglo-Saxon Culture, Dr Michael Bintley (University of Canterbury)
A whole day investigation into the various ways in which the relationship between the Anglo-Saxons and trees influenced the development of religion, literature, and culture in early medieval England, considered from a variety of disciplines: literature and other written sources, landscape archaeology, artefacts and art history
.2nd JulyrainbowMore Details Gold in Ground: The Old English Riddles and their Relatives, Professor Michael Alexander
A day with the distinguished poet, scholar, and translator, Professor Michael Alexander, exploring the early English heroic, elegiac, and wisdom poetry, approaching them via the Riddles, those playful, lovely, or naughty poems which offer a key to unlock Old English poetry.
9th Julyoxen

More details

Anglo-Saxon Farming, Dr Debby Banham (University of Cambridge)
We shall explore how agriculture supported the Anglo-Saxon population, looking at arable farming and animal husbandry, tools, techniques and beliefs, as well as changes during the half millennium and more of the Anglo-Saxon period.